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 Broke Again Bradfords
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7/21/2014 9:46:53 PM reply with quote send message to Broke Again Bradfords Object to Post

Some, do, Matty, some do.

MOST vets know that leaving a cow in labor for 8 hours is a real bad idea.

Shoot, most vets know that leaving them in labor for more than 1 hour is bad.

And I second what Trent said- don't breed cattle until you can properly handle calvings and calf care. Might be better for you to buy calves for a bit.
 smammyc
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7/21/2014 10:29:44 PM reply with quote send message to smammyc Object to Post

Letting her push for that long may cause her to prolapse. Once they prolapse they almost always do it when they calve. Cross your fingers you didn't just create a hamburger cow. The calf probably sucked in amniotic fluid, had water on the lungs and died of pneumonia. Hard to know without being there but that's my guess. Tell dad there are plenty of calving ease bulls in the angus breed that won't kill your cows.
 smammyc
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7/21/2014 10:33:03 PM reply with quote send message to smammyc Object to Post

I'm also curious about the other calves out of the commercial cows bred to the bull. What were you feeding these two heifers that had huge calves?
 Broke Again Bradfords
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7/21/2014 10:42:33 PM reply with quote send message to Broke Again Bradfords Object to Post

"The calf probably sucked in amniotic fluid, had water on the lungs and died of pneumonia. "

Calf isn't going to die of pneumonia 4 hours after birth.

It most likely drowned, like I said in my 2nd post.



 smammyc
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7/21/2014 10:54:02 PM reply with quote send message to smammyc Object to Post

this post has been edited 1 time(s)

the one that lived for a week and died after his breathing weakened

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Last edited by smammyc on 7/21/2014 10:54:57 PM
 Sowden Ranch
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7/22/2014 1:36:07 AM reply with quote send message to Sowden Ranch Object to Post

first question- was the cow a first calve heifer? cause if so it was probably a bad idea to put her to a big birth weight bull. for ours we look for bulls in the low 1s to - birth weights, to be safe for a easier birth.

secondly- if it was pushing and got stuck for 8 hours the calf was probably going to be dead as it came out anyway. and why wouldn't you start pulling the calf earlier than 1pm if you knew the cow was struggling to get the calf out, or if you didn't know how or what CALL A VET! and as for the cow, it probably got so exhausted from pushing for so long!

thirdly- if the calf was cloudy in the eyes it could of had Blight (I think that's how you spell it). But I think they would of had to be out and walking and doing other stuff to get it, but not straight away like that. But I don't know.

and finally fourthly- as for the cows there hips probably couldn't cope with such HUGE calves.


Well that's just my subjection on the birth, so don't criticize me again for my opinion or idea....

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 Whitebrook Farms
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7/22/2014 6:52:04 AM reply with quote send message to Whitebrook Farms Object to Post

this post has been edited 4 time(s)

The cow was bred to a low birth weight bull of 62lbs and the calf was breathing okay at first. And her water didn't break until 1pm but she was ready since 6am. My usual vet was out of town so we had to use someone else. My dad will not let me buy my show steers for a lot of money. I am forced to pick something out of the field. They were both 1st time calves. I did hear from a MA breeder that some 1st time calves of that breed do lose their calves. The commercial cows bred to that bull were way smaller then these 2MA but the cows were way older them these 2. The commercial cows calve very easily. I am also reading up on MA cows for next year.

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Last edited by Whitebrook Farms on 7/22/2014 7:51:02 AM
 smammyc
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7/22/2014 10:12:03 AM reply with quote send message to smammyc Object to Post

what is your definition of ready to go (she was ready to go all morning). What were you feeding the heifers?
 Whitebrook Farms
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7/22/2014 11:59:31 AM reply with quote send message to Whitebrook Farms Object to Post

She was pacing and up and down and they were fed grass
 Matty.Martin
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7/22/2014 1:56:49 PM reply with quote send message to Matty.Martin Object to Post

If they where much bigger then the commercial cattle n still had trouble they were obviously fed too much feed in the last few weeks of pregnancy.

Sowden you need to learn to read whats been said before asking questions, the answer to all your questions are in the first few posts.

As for whitebrook your story keeps changing and has soo many holes in it
 Whitebrook Farms
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7/22/2014 2:07:03 PM reply with quote send message to Whitebrook Farms Object to Post

this post has been edited 2 time(s)

My story is that the heifer that calved saturday was pacing and laying down from 6am-1pm and her water broke at 1pm and the calf was out by 2pm. The calf was hip locked and the cow wasn't really trying to push so it had to be pulled and our usually vet was out of town. The calf was breathing real nice when it first got on the ground but the calf wouldn't try to stand at all. The cow wasn't getting up for a few minutes and was wobbly for a few hours. The cow did get up and kicked her calf. The cow then layer down on the calf when they were left alone, it layer on its legs but none ended up broken. The cow was milked and the calf was fed the milk by a tube when it still wouldn't stand 2 hrs later and refused the bottle. After the milk the calf still was weak with the eyes cloudy. Her breathing got shallower and shallower until it stopped completely. On the other cow birth the cow calved in the middle of the night and by herself when she was found the next time she was down with a dead calf beside her. Once she did get up she was really weak and was paralyzed for a week. Both calves were sired by a 62lb polled Hereford bull. That same bull sired a lot of other cows that never had a problem. It was both cows 1 st calves. They were both fed grass all spring and summer with little feed

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Last edited by Whitebrook Farms on 7/22/2014 2:07:44 PM

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Last edited by Whitebrook Farms on 7/22/2014 2:08:07 PM
 smammyc
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7/22/2014 3:28:27 PM reply with quote send message to smammyc Object to Post

Who sired the cows
 Whitebrook Farms
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7/22/2014 4:04:39 PM reply with quote send message to Whitebrook Farms Object to Post

It was no big name sire just a bull
 smammyc
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7/22/2014 4:06:25 PM reply with quote send message to smammyc Object to Post

this post has been edited 1 time(s)

Cow bw affects 1/3 of the calf size. environment and sire are the other 2/3. Tell me you're giving that cow antibiotics

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Last edited by smammyc on 7/22/2014 4:06:44 PM
 Whitebrook Farms
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7/22/2014 4:54:50 PM reply with quote send message to Whitebrook Farms Object to Post

Yeah she's getting some, it is from the sub vet and once our usual vet is back he will check up on her
 Franks
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7/22/2014 7:07:44 PM reply with quote send message to Franks Object to Post

Calf*


That is all...

Thank You
 Broke Again Brafords
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7/22/2014 7:18:46 PM reply with quote send message to Broke Again Brafords Object to Post

this post has been edited 1 time(s)

quote
posted by Whitebrook Farms
My story is that the heifer that calved saturday was pacing and laying down from 6am-1pm and her water broke at 1pm and the calf was out by 2pm. The calf was hip locked and the cow wasn't really trying to push so it had to be pulled and our usually vet was out of town. The calf was breathing real nice when it first got on the ground but the calf wouldn't try to stand at all. The cow wasn't getting up for a few minutes and was wobbly for a few hours. The cow did get up and kicked her calf. The cow then layer down on the calf when they were left alone, it layer on its legs but none ended up broken. The cow was milked and the calf was fed the milk by a tube when it still wouldn't stand 2 hrs later and refused the bottle. After the milk the calf still was weak with the eyes cloudy. Her breathing got shallower and shallower until it stopped completely. On the other cow birth the cow calved in the middle of the night and by herself when she was found the next time she was down with a dead calf beside her. Once she did get up she was really weak and was paralyzed for a week. Both calves were sired by a 62lb polled Hereford bull. That same bull sired a lot of other cows that never had a problem. It was both cows 1 st calves. They were both fed grass all spring and summer with little feed

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Last edited by Whitebrook Farms on 7/22/2014 2:08:07 PM

This isn't what it sounded like the first time you posted.

For starters- the calf was too big, and stuck too long.

The cow kicking the calf and then falling on it didn't help.

PLEASE tell me you guys held the calf upright when you tubed it- and knew how to make sure you weren't in the lungs with the tube?

Because it sounds like:

Calf too big + stuck too long (which caused the pinched nerve that caused the cows paralysis) + trauma from the cow + possibly drowning it when you tube fed her = dead calf.

OH- and "laid" not "layer"- cow can't "layer" on it's calf's legs.

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Last edited by Broke Again Brafords on 7/22/2014 7:20:47 PM
 Franks
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7/22/2014 7:22:20 PM reply with quote send message to Franks Object to Post

English 101 and Cattle 101 classes held by babs Monday thru Friday at your convenience
 Whitebrook Farms
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7/22/2014 8:00:28 PM reply with quote send message to Whitebrook Farms Object to Post

this post has been edited 2 time(s)

I did mean laid on the calf. And the calf was held up right when tube fed. The calf also didn't have fluid in its lungs at all from the tube bc I didn't do it. The vet did it and the calf actually got some energy from that and started kicking around and sorta attempting to stand but soon quit



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Last edited by Whitebrook Farms on 7/22/2014 8:03:51 PM
 Broke Again Bradfords
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7/22/2014 8:11:30 PM reply with quote send message to Broke Again Bradfords Object to Post

wait a minute.

You said you had to call the vet, and the vet told you to wait. You never said the vet came.

Now you are saying the vet came?

I'm confused as hell, however, I still stand by what I said- being stuck, plus trauma, plus possibly drowning from fluid in the lungs, and possibly a birth defect.

and I'm done trying to wrap my head around this mess.

Good luck trying to have live calves in the future.

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